ANDREA GRIECO: THE INTERVIEW


SBP NEWS

07 March 2022

ANDREA GRIECO: THE INTERVIEW


SBP NEWS

07 March 2022

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The Italian proponent of sustainability

Image by Andrea Grieco 

Andrea Grieco is the Italian proponent of sustainability. He is 30 years old and one of the first young Italians to have truly believed in the power of change and the power of sustainability.

From his experience supporting climate migrants in Morocco to his work as a lobbyist for the UN, he became a true human rights expert. Then his journey veered towards education on the SDGs and the 2030 Agenda, where he found his great passion.

So, what is he doing now? Currently he is a Sustainability and SDGs Specialist and works for WILL ITA, one of the leading communication editorial projects in Italy. It involves thousands of young people to make them aware of the economic and political situation in society.

Through the following interview, we had the honor to experience with him his sustainable path and his adventures around the world.

“I think that the future of sustainability will only turn around through human rights, fashion and finance. These are the three keys to the future of sustainability.”


Image by Andrea Grieco

Image by Andrea Grieco


Interview

Welcome Andrea, tell us a little about yourself, how did your interest in sustainability come about, coming from a law-related university background?


I am a Sustainability Consultant and SDGs Specialist. My path is unique, because I invented my job. There was no definition for Sustainable Business Strategist and I definitely come from a very different field. I began my journey towards sustainability by studying International Humanitarian Law and writing a thesis about migrants and refugees. Then, after graduation, I had the opportunity to work with climate migrants between Spain and Morocco and I thought everyone could talk about economic migrants, but who talks about climate migrants? This is how my revolution towards sustainability started.

How did this experience in Morocco influence your personal and professional development?

Personally, it was a great experience, but also very intense. I witnessed up close the human rights violations and tragedy of these climate migrants without having the opportunity to do anything. That has left a strong mark on me. From a professional point of view, I did something that anyone who wants to work in this field would do. I worked closely with an NGO, the most important one in Andalusia, and I had the opportunity to continue my formation on the 2030 Agenda. This is where I realized I wanted to be an activist, something I have always felt since I was a kid. In fact, my passion for human rights started when I was in middle school, because I had to write a research paper on Martin Luther King and Mahatma Gandhi. So, in Morocco, my path as an activist took off.

How did you get into working for the UN and how did it influence you in working with Amnesty International?

After finishing my experience in Morocco, I returned to Italy and continued my educational path on the 2030 Agenda and sustainable geopolitics at a UN agency in Rome. In light of the fact that I have always revolved around Amnesty International in Italy, when there was a need for support at the lobby office, they called me and that is where my experience started. Moreover, at that time working as a lobbyist in Italy was really complicated because of the political situation, but it was a really important journey. I carry with me the desire for change that Amnesty International activist Tina Marinari passed on to me, shaping me so much in my job. Then I worked with the Navy at the Hydrographic Institute where I was a lobbyist and managed a sustainability campaign for the Navy in the Arctic looking for micro plastics in the ocean.